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I know it feels great after a long day at work to snuggle up with a good book, your fave TV show or your cat or dog for some unconditional loving. Of course, its nice to think of having a rich handsome man sweep you off your feet but what you really want is a man who is going to be there for you through the ups and the downs of this journey called life. There is no doubt about it, without the right skill set and support in place, dating can be hard.
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Understanding teen dating abuse

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Teen Dating Violence This web page from the CDC includes an overview of teen dating violence definitions, the consequences of and reasons for dating violence, and a list of additional resources. Teen Dating Violence among LGBTQ Youth This Human Rights Campaign overview of teen dating violence among LGBTQ youth also includes a list of national resources that serve LGBTQ survivors of intimate partner violence.Understanding Teen Dating Violence (PDF) This concise fact sheet developed by the CDC helps explain: Why is dating violence a public health problem? Dating Violence Prevention, Teens Ages 13 to 19 Years The New York State Department of Health provides an overview and links to state and national resources.The CDC defines teen dating violence as "physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking" [1]. almost 1.5 million high school students experience physical abuse from a partner every year?Preventing teen dating violence starts with awareness. Or that out of every three young people, one has been a victim of physical, sexual, emotional, or verbal abuse from someone they are dating?Teen dating violence is a growing public health issue.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention research, one in 10 high school students report being a victim of physical dating violence.

Strategies that promote healthy and respectful relationships are vital.

Most tragically, every year there are young people who are murdered by a current or former partner.

[3] The following resources can help promote knowledge about teen dating violence, facilitate effective intervention and prevention, and give guidance on seeking or providing help. Dating Abuse Statistics This fact sheet from Loveisrespect details statistics about young adult dating violence, including prevalence of dating violence among youth as well as college students, lasting effects, and lack of awareness among peers and parents.

Welcome to Do Something.org, a global movement of 5.5 million young people making positive change, online and off!

The 11 facts you want are below, and the sources for the facts are at the very bottom of the page.

Unfortunately, teen dating violence is widespread and can have serious long-term and short-term effects; and, many kids do not report it because they are afraid or ashamed to tell friends and family.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “teen dating violence is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking. government annual Youth Risk Behavior Survey included questions about purposeful physical violence in a dating relationship such as “being hit, slammed into something or injured with an object or weapon” or being forced to "do sexual things that you did not want to do." About 13,000 students in grades 9 through 12 responded to the survey.

Interestingly, the rates of reported victimization versus perpetration in the state were similar for boys and girls.[3] However, when it comes to severe teen dating violence — including sexual and physical assault — girls were disproportionately the victims.[4] At a recent workshop on teen dating violence, co-sponsored by the U. Departments of Justice (DOJ) and Health and Human Services (HHS), researchers presented findings from several studies that found that girls and boys perpetrate the same frequency of physical aggression in romantic relationships.

This finding was at odds with what practitioners attending the workshop said they encounter in their professional experience.

And so, to help further the discussion, we offer in this article a gender-based analysis of teen dating violence with a developmental perspective.[5] We look at what we know — and what we don't know — about who is the perpetrator and who is the victim in teen dating violence.

We also discuss how adult and adolescent romantic relationships differ in the hope that an examination of existing research will help us better understand the problem and move the field toward the creation of developmentally appropriate prevention programs and effective interventions for teenagers.